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3 edition of North Atlantic deep water formation found in the catalog.

North Atlantic deep water formation

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Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Branch in Washington, D.C, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Seawater -- Composition -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Theodore Bennett, Wallace Broecker, and James Hansen.
    GenreCongresses.
    SeriesNASA conference publication -- 2367
    ContributionsBennett, T., Broecker, Wallace S., 1931-, Hansen, James E. 1941-
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, [2 p.], 66 p. :
    Number of Pages66
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24130572M
    OCLC/WorldCa122262288

      North Atlantic Deep Water Top # 9 Facts. Deep Ocean Circulation in the North Atlantic and Rapid Climate Change During the Last Ice Age - Duration: deep water formation - . Hemisphere the primary region of deep water formation is the North Atlantic; minor amounts of deep water are formed in the Red Sea and Persian Gulf. A variety of water types contribute to the so-called North Atlantic Deep Water. Each one of them differs, though they share a common attribute Read More; Pacific Ocean.

    the LGM North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) shoaled to form Glacial North Atlantic Intermediate Water (GNAIW) and was completely replaced by southern-sourced water in the deep Atlantic (km)6,7. However, elucidation of the water mass distribution . The main product of this transformation is North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), which forms poleward of 50° N and fills much of the Atlantic between ∼1 and 4 km depth below sea surface. NADW formation is thus associated with the release of a great deal of heat to the high northern latitude atmosphere.

    The words "North Atlantic deep water" are often followed by the word "formation," because the North Atlantic Ocean is one of two major places on earth (the other being the Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica) where cold, saline water sinks to the bottom of the sea. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is an aliphatic fluorinated compound with eight carbon atoms that is extremely persistent in the environment and can adversely affect human and ecological health. The stability, low reactivity, and high water solubility of PFOS combined with the North American phaseout in production around the year make it a potentially useful new tracer for ocean by:


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North Atlantic deep water formation Download PDF EPUB FB2

North Atlantic deep water formation Item Preview remove-circle This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Library. plus-circle Add Review. comment. Reviews There are no reviews yet.

Be the first one to write a review. Views Pages: Compared with the North Atlantic, this freshness completely inhibits formation of deep waters and weakens formation of intermediate water in the northern North Pacific. At this global scale, the Pacific is one of the broad regions of deep upwelling that returns deep waters formed elsewhere back to mid-depths or even the surface.

Title. North Atlantic deep water formation / Related Titles. Series: NASA conference publication ; By. Bennett, T. Broecker, Wallace S., Hansen, James E. The formation of North Atlantic Deep Water. Cold, dense, deep water forms in two areas of the northern North Atlantic – in the Labrador Sea (between Greenland and Canada) and in the GIN Sea (between Greenland, Iceland and Norway).

Because it originates in the North Atlantic it is known as North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). Deep Water Formation Peter D. Killworth Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics Silver Street, Cambridge CBS 9EW, ENGLAND In this talk I attempted to cover, from a theoretician's point of view, many of the features of deep water formation, specifically as they apply to North Atlantic deep water.

Stability of North Atlantic Deep Water Formation in a Global Ocean General Circulation Model. Bennett, T., W.

Broecker, and J. Hansen (Eds.), North Atlantic Deep Water Formation. NASA CP National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This report contains the proceedings and recommendations of a workshop on North Atlantic Deep Water Formation held on Juneat Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, New York.

North Atlantic Deep Water formation inhibits high Arctic contamination by continental perfluorooctane sulfonate discharges. Xianming Zhang. Corresponding Author. the North Atlantic PFOS reservoir was equivalent to 60% of cumulative inputs from the North American and European continents ( Mg).

Cited by: Deep-water Formation in the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans. In addition to surface water flows, deep-water formation processes within the Arctic Ocean and Nordic Seas have been elucidated through the study of reprocessing releases.

This sinking water mass, characterized by cold, salty water, is known as North Atlantic Deep Water and is given the acronym NADW.

The volume of sinking water is enormous, equal to the flow of 25 Amazon Rivers -- equal to the same volume as every raindrop which falls on the earth -- a huge volume of water. North Atlantic deep water formation and AMOC in CMIP5 models Article (PDF Available) in Ocean Science 13(4) July with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Dating the onset of deep-water flow between the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans is critical for modelling climate change in the Northern Hemisphere 1,2 and for explaining changes in global ocean Cited by:   RECENT climate records from ice cores and deep-sea sediments suggest that there has been considerable climate variability in the North Atlantic region over Cited by: in red and North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) in blue.

The winter sea ice cover (white) is held back in the Atlantic sector by the warm North Atlantic Current. (Figure by the author, modified for the Arctic by G.

Holloway.) Some observational data As explained above, the THC is not a measurable quantity but rather a conceptual by: surface water and North Atlantic surface water are con-verted into deep or bottom water. Observational studies (Carmack and Foster ; Foster and Carmack ; Foster ) have located only about one-third as much bottom water formation at various sites along the coast of Antarctica compared to the estimated rate of NADW formation, but large.

The North Atlantic Central Read More; paleoceanography. In paleoceanography resulted in the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water, which began flowing south along the continental rise of North America at this time.

Sediments redistributed and deposited by this deep current are called contourites and have been extensively studied by. North Atlantic deep water formation. Washington, D.C.: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Branch ; Springfield, Va.: For sale by the National Technical Information Service, (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication, Government publication, National government publication.

We investigate the formation process and pathways of deep water masses in a coupled ice–ocean model of the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans. The intent is to determine the relative roles of these water masses from the different source regions (Arctic Ocean, Nordic Seas, and Subpolar Atlantic) in the meridional overturning circulation.

The model exhibits significant decadal variability in Cited by: North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) is a deep water mass formed in the North Atlantic Ocean.

Thermohaline circulation (properly described as meridional overturning circulation) of the world's oceans involves the flow of warm surface waters from the southern hemisphere into the North Atlantic.

Water flowing northward becomes modified through evaporation and mixing with other water masses. It has been suggested that the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) also began at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (Via and Thomas ), perhaps facilitated by both the subsidence of the.

North Atlantic deep water formation processes and properties in climate models are indicative of their ability to simulate future ocean circulation, ventilation, carbon and heat uptake, and sea level rise.

Historical time series of temperature, salinity, sea ice concentration and ocean transport in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre and Nordic.It is very possible, for example, that if current thinking about the control of deep water formation is correct, any global warming that might occur in the future would intensify earth's hydrologic cycle and deliver more freshwater to the critical deep water source region of the North Atlantic, leading to reduced deep water formation there and a slowdown of the thermohaline circulation that would stall.

Most of the densest, deepest water at the bottom of the oceans comes from two regions, the North Atlantic and the circum-Antarctic. Have other regions been able to produce significant quantities of deep water in the past? For decades, researchers have looked, with limited success, for evidence of deepwater formation in the North Pacific since the time of the Last Glacial Maximum, Cited by: